Beginner Gardener Tips: Should You Till?

We’ll be doing raised beds from here on out.

The Raised Bed Farm Blog

When we bought our first house in 2000, it had a 1000 square foot area that had been gardened by the 90-year-old prior owner for 20 years.  It was a simple rectangular area, and she had planted her crops in rows, with a big Rhubarb in the corner.

f69f6-andytilling2The soil was hard-packed clay, and while there were definitely crops growing, it was hard to imagine where the water would go.

We had read about raised bed gardening in a book by Edward C. Smith called The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible that we could till up the soil to make raised beds without having to bring in extra soil.  We didn’t have much money, so this made sense to us.

We found a tool rental shop, and it was about $75 to rent a gas-powered tiller for a day.  I had zero experience or fear, so there was a bit of a…

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Back on Track, and Updates

It was hard to put this video out, but I thought you all deserved an explanation.  I had a little slump.  I had foot surgery and it triggered some unpleasant memories.  In addition, we have been house hunting and I tried to give up my dreams only to find out that my dreams wouldn’t let me!  LOTS more to follow.  Thanks for sticking with us!

A better idea of us and longer story:
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Eggs – Who Knew?

All about eggs!

Town & Country Gardening

Eggs are the ultimate hunger buster. Rich in both muscle building protein and satiating healthy fats, studies have shown that people who eat eggs in the morning will consume less for the rest of the day. Plus, their amino acid profile maximizes building and preserving lean muscle mass, which can help your body burn fat. Eggs are also full of B-vitamins and choline, micro nutrients which are important for brain development, muscle health, and energy levels.

USDA 2015 statistics, said “93 percent of all eggs purchased in America come from conventional caged systems known as battery cages.”
A 2011 Poultry Science study conducted over two years found that free range eggs were not all that nutritionally different from the eggs of hens kept in a cage. The only clear difference the Poultry Science study found was that there are higher beta carotene levels in range eggs, which contributes to…

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